When Being Healthy Becomes Unhealthy: Part II

Posted On Sep 25, 2019 By Erin Kuh, MBA, RD

A woman on the floor meditating.

In Part 1, I discussed 7 warning signs that healthy habits are going overboard. The first step in moving towards a healthy mindset filled with self-love instead of body bashing is to recognize there is a problem. The next step is to adopt one or all of the following practices to change the focus from negative, discontentment, and unhappiness to a positive healthy self-image.

  • Stop with the compulsive measurements.

    Throw out the scale (or tuck it away for awhile), stop tracking calories and weighing portions. Practice intuitive eating, the practice of following your gut and listening to your body’s physical cues for hunger and fullness, instead. There are some great online resources and this book on intuitive eating is good place to start.

  • Unfollow and de-friend any social media sources promoting extreme diets, tons of supplements, or fitness regimens.

    If this doesn’t help, try going social media free for a few weeks and see how this effects your self-outlook.

  • Adopt self-talk (what you say to yourself) that is how a good friend would talk to you.

    I’m guessing you wouldn’t tell a loved one the harsh things floating around in your head that you think about yourself.

  • Create a positive mantra reinforcing your strengths, both physical and mental, say it daily and smile while you say it.

    Sounds cheesy, but it works! Write it down to reinforce your mantra even more.

  • Take a Yoga class.

    Yoga promotes self-acceptance, no matter what size or fitness level you’re at. Exposing and surrounding yourself with people and an environment that promote psychological health as much as physical health is essential. Look for a gentle or restorative class, if you’re a Yoga newbie.

    A woman meditating in her home.
  • Celebrate progress made or accomplishments achieved…

    and give yourself permission to take a break without guilt. If you’re sick, injured, or overly fatigued get some extra rest. It will do your body, and mind, good!

  • If you or someone you know is still struggling, seek professional help.

    Don’t wait until fitness obsession becomes a full-blown eating disorder, a serious injury or illness occurs, or years of unhappiness pass.

Let’s support one another in celebrating health and fitness, and achieving the best version of ourselves possible. Along the way, remember your “best” and my “best” may look very different on the outside.


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A fit man looking tired sitting on the floor.